Tuesday, 21 November 2017
Latest news
Main » Justice vetoes lawmakers' budget, criticizes funding cuts

Justice vetoes lawmakers' budget, criticizes funding cuts

15 April 2017
Justice vetoes lawmakers' budget, criticizes funding cuts

As he vetoed the state budget approved last weekend by the Republican-controlled Legislature, criticizing the cuts and lawmakers, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said he was exhausted of the politics.

"We don't have a nothing burger today, and we don't have a mayonnaise sandwich", Justice said in a reference to his previous comparisons for Republican budgets.

Making comparisons to the budget and overal state of legislative action, Justice unveiled a "nothing burger", a mayonaise sandwhich and an analog for bull dung. "And we don't have a mayonnaise sandwich", Justice said as he revealed an empty hamburger bun and two slices of bread with mayo. "What we have is nothing more than bunch of political bull you-know-what".

House Speaker Tim Armstead and Senate President Mitch Carmichael had both urged the governor to sign the Legislature's budget bill into law.

Justice posted a video of his political sideshow on Twitter, complete with a "poop" emoji.

He appeared to be calling their bluff as he used a set of three whiteboards to illustrate the budget cuts he refused to endorse.

Lawmakers would need a two-thirds majority to override the governor's veto.

"The unfortunate effect of this bill is that it weakens existing professional safeguards governing the medical knowledge and skills of physician assistants that have been serving the public interest for years", Justice said.

"It's just a game", he said. We don't have to be a bunch of children.

"There's something that goes on in this great building that I don't like", Justice told allies and news media gathered in the Capitol, where legislators meet. "But you know at the end of all the games. there's a family out there, and we're hurting them".

The West Virginia Association of PAs says it would expand access to quality health care particularly in underserved areas. "They sent us here to protect their wallets", Armstead told the Charleston Gazette-Mail.

Only this time the poop-fueled argument was for more government ...