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Britain-EU Brexit talks to start Monday as planned

18 June 2017
Britain-EU Brexit talks to start Monday as planned

But in a statement, officials said: "David Davis, Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, and Michel Barnier, the European Commission's chief negotiator, agreed today to launch Article 50 negotiations on Monday, June 19".

Her failure to win a majority has put May under pressure over her Brexit plans from inside and outside her party and has prompted complaints about her choice of partner due to the DUP's stance on social issues such as gay marriage. He pulled out of the event after a fire gutted a high-rise residential tower in London, leaving at least 17 dead. "The talks are ongoing, they are very positive, they are constructive".

Following talks in Dublin with the new Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, she said that reaching a "sensible" Brexit had been the focus of their talks. "We never put timescales on when we expect a deal to be done and I'm not going to start now".

The start of parliament has been delayed since last Thursday's election, a gamble May took to strengthen her hand in talks to leave the European Union but which has left her scrambling for a deal with the eurosceptic DUP to keep her in power.

"We will continue with those negotiations throughout the weekend and into next week".

After the general election fiasco, May hopes to secure the backing of the ultra-conservative Democratic Unionist Party, which would add the DUP's 10 seats to the Conservatives' 317 in the 650-member House of Commons.

The UK Government wants the talks to take place in parallel during the Brexit process but both sides have made finding a solution to the issue of citizens' rights a priority.

And Ms Soubry - a leading figure in the Remain campaign before last year's European Union referendum - told the BBC's Sunday Politics programme that Mrs May would have to listen to businesses and "wise owls" in her government who are calling for the single market to be a priority over immigration curbs.

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said in a Bloomberg Television interview this week that as soon as "the principles" of Brexit are agreed, talks can move on in parallel to "the details of the regulation, and what will be the further relations between the United Kingdom, after Brexit, and the single market and the European Union, and so on". Her Conservative Party called such an arrangement "necessary" in its election manifesto.