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Schiff says firing Mueller would echo Watergate

18 June 2017
Schiff says firing Mueller would echo Watergate

High-profile supporters of President Donald Trump are turning on special counsel Robert Mueller, the man charged with investigating Russian interference in the USA election and possible collusion with Trump's campaign. "I think he's weighing that option".

Until now, Mueller had drawn widespread praise from Republicans and Democrats alike.

They have done it before: Think about how it floated the idea of Mueller's potential conflicts of interest and remember those charges of Democratic ties to acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe?

But expressions of discontent with Mueller are bubbling up nonetheless.

"I personally think it would be a very significant mistake", Ruddy added. This will also help him clear his name and will make him focus on governing without this cloud of doubt hovering over him.

Said Ryan: "I know Bob Mueller".

Ruddy's comments followed days of seemingly coordinated attacks on Mueller's integrity by Trump allies. [Al] Franken [D-Minn.]. I want to know why, if he was recused from the Russian Federation investigation, he played any role in the dismissal of FBI Director Comey.

Anxiety about the probe - and fresh concerns about the political leanings of some of the attorneys involved - is percolating in the West Wing of the White House.

"I think it is a consideration the President has had because Mueller is illegitimate as special counsel", Christopher Ruddy, the CEO of Newsmax Media, told CNN's Chris Cuomo on "New Day" Tuesday.

But he did note Tuesday morning in an email to Politico that a subsequent statement from White House press secretary Sean Spicer "doesn't deny my claim the President is considering firing Mueller" and that Ruddy never claimed to have spoken with Trump about Mueller.

Still, it took until Tuesday night for the White House to actually dispute Ruddy's suspicion.

The Fox News host then shifted the discussion to the "actual crimes and actual collusion", all that don't involve President Trump, but do involve Comey, Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch, and Hillary Clinton.

"He is being advised by many people not to do it", the source said. The person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss private conversations. Mueller is a former FBI Director who unlike Trump understands how Washington, D.C works.

And the Daily Caller reported on Tuesday that included an interview with Mueller. Can Trump really act by himself and fire the special prosecutor?

The top Democrat on the House Intelligence committee says Congress would not sit still if President Donald Trump chose to fire the special counsel leading the investigation into Russian interference in the US election and possible collusion with Trump's campaign.

Even if Trump's legal team was able to convince a court that Trump is allowed to fire Mueller, there is no doubt a firestorm would ensue.

It would be hard to make the case, he said, that the experience of interviewing for Federal Bureau of Investigation director would make it impossible for Mueller to fairly exercise the broad discretion afforded to prosecutors.

He said in a news conference last Friday, June 9, that he would be cooperating 100 percent with the investigation and would be willing to give his testimony under oath to prove his innocence. The Attorney General shall inform the Special Counsel in writing of the specific reason for his or her removal. Ruddy agrees that the move would be a wrong move, but dismissed the investigation Mueller is overseeing.

Ruddy appeared to be basing his remarks, at least in part, on comments from Jay Sekulow, a member of Trump's legal team, who told ABC in an interview Sunday that he was "not going to speculate" on whether Trump might at some point order Rosenstein to fire Mueller.

Trump has boxed himself in a corner. Still, he said: "Bob Mueller did a great job as Federal Bureau of Investigation director". I do have questions for the attorney general.