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How Dianne Feinstein's re-election bid encapsulates the divide within the Democratic Party

10 October 2017
How Dianne Feinstein's re-election bid encapsulates the divide within the Democratic Party

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGun proposal picks up GOP support Gingrich: Banning rapid fire gun modification is "common sense" House bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance MORE (D-Calif.) announced on Monday morning that she will run for reelection in 2018.

As the Associated Press notes, Feinstein is now the oldest US Senator, at age 84, and she will be turning 85 in June, but she shows no signs of wanting to slow down or kick back and retire.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Garcetti wrote, "In this topsy-turvy world of the Trump administration, we need her seniority and her experience now, more than ever", in an invitation to the fundraiser, which he is co-hosting with his wife, Amy Wakeland.

Throughout her 25 years in the Senate, Feinstein has often been on the left flank of the Democratic Party, and while she has supported the Affordable Care Act and the environment, she has also supported the Iraq War, the Patriot Act and its extension, and the controversial Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which enabled the government to create massive data-sweeping programs that many civil liberties advocates denounced as overly broad. If elected, this will be her fifth term.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who authored the 1990s ban on assault weapons, said over the weekend that Congress must pass a law banning the so-called bump stock devices used in last week's massacre at a Las Vegas country music festival. She said the change in gun laws must be permanent and codified by Congress, not addressed through regulations only. The devices were found on several of the weapons in the assailant's Las Vegas hotel room. "We are better off with her leadership and I look forward to continuing to fight together for California in the Senate".

The mere implication that Trump could be a "good president" drew the ire of state Senate president Kevin de León, whose recent two-day trip to Washington was seen as laying the groundwork for a potential Senate run. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), who has served since 1977, has still not officially stated whether he plans to run again.

Now that Feinstein has announced her intentions, the political future of one other long-serving senator remains unknown. Sen.