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Russian election propaganda also appeared on Google, YouTube and Gmail, report says

10 October 2017
Russian election propaganda also appeared on Google, YouTube and Gmail, report says

What's more, the Washington Post report - which cites unnamed sources - says the Russian agents appear to be different from the ones who bought ads on Facebook and Twitter.

This is the first time Google has discovered any evidence of Russian interference in the 2016 United States election.

Last month, Facebook disclosed that a company tied to the Russian government had purchased at least $100,000 in ads as part of a propaganda campaign, and later said the ads reached 10 million people.

These accounts used YouTube, Google search advertising, Gmail advertising and Google's DoubleClick ad platform to push divisive campaigns based on issues ranging from race to immigration to gun rights at times leading up to the 2016 election.

Google has avoided the intense scrutiny Facebook has been subjected to over the response to alleged Russian electoral interference, however this could change as the investigation continues. In September, Google spokeswoman Andrea Faville told The Washington Post that the company is "always monitoring for abuse or violations of our policies".

Facebook found roughly 3,000 ads adverts linked to Russian Federation - but it has refused to publicly release them despite calls from congressional investigators.

Facebook, Twitter and now Google. Snap, however, told Recode that it has searched its data and found no evidence of any Russian-bought ads.

While these ads were timed around the U.S. election, they rarely focused directly on that subject.

However, the company launched an investigation after Congress urged the technology giant to determine whether the Russians used its various platforms in order to meddle in the election.

Facebook announced last month it had unearthed $100,000 in spending by the Internet Research Agency and, under pressure from lawmakers, has pledged to be more transparent about how its ads are purchased and targeted.

The news about Google comes amid a flurry of reports about how Facebook is dealing with bearing the brunt of the blame for "fake news" affecting the election.

Twitter, meanwhile, also "proactively" shared with Congress a "round-up of ads" that Russia's state-run TV network Russia Today (RT) targeted at US users in 2016.

Executives from Twitter and Facebook have said they will testify before Congress on November 1 regarding Russia's attempts to sow dissent on the social media platforms.