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Pakistan won't seek United States aid resumption: Army Chief Bajwa

14 January 2018
Pakistan won't seek United States aid resumption: Army Chief Bajwa

Several U.S. officials have held talks with senior Pakistani civilian and military leaders to find what one called "common ground" after President Donald Trump rebuked Pakistan in a series of tweets and then said the U.S. would no longer provide aid to Islamabad.

"The way the United States has treated Pakistan as a doormat is not fair", he said.

Should he become Pakistan's prime minister, Khan said "yes we would talk", referring to Trump, but added that the USA dishonors the memory of thousands of Pakistan's soldiers who died battling insurgents in its tribal regions, as well as that of tens of thousands of Pakistanis who died in terrorist attacks.

Khan added that he feels the United States has dishonored the Pakistani soldiers who have been killed fighting insurgents in its volatile tribal regions and the thousands of Pakistanis who have died in terror attacks.

He also suspended almost $2 billion in security assistance to Pakistan.

In a press briefing, Khan, who has an global reputation as a ladies man and at home is seen more as a religious conservative, said he has been a staunch opponent of Pakistan's participation in the war on terror since it began in 2001 following the 9/11 attacks on the U.S.

"Pakistan is also important to situation in Afghanistan".

The US General acknowledged the recent actions taken by Pakistan for the hospitality of Afghan refugees and agreed that both countries stand to gain from cooperative engagement.

USA troops have been in the country ever since, supporting the government in Kabul's fight against the Taliban and other insurgents, including Islamic State (IS). He insisted Pakistan should have supported the USA campaign against terrorism but it should not have deployed tens of thousands of troops to the country's tribal regions on the Afghan border to fight its own people. COAS said that entire Pakistani nation felt betrayed over USA recent statements despite decades of cooperation.

According to Dawn, this was conveyed to Islamabad by Centcom Commander Gen Joseph Votel in a telephonic conversation to Pakistan's army chief Gen Qamar Bajwa last week.

USA and Pakistani officials say neither has happened, and in conversations over the last week the two sides have tried to move past Trump's incendiary rhetoric. The military aid is a suspension and not a cutoff for Pakistan.

Khan and his party spearheaded street protests and a subsequent legal battle that ousted Pakistan's thrice-elected prime minister, Nawaz Sharif, from office last July on corruption charges.