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Diesel graveyard: Volkswagen dumps thousands of cars in desert after emissions scandal

02 April 2018
Diesel graveyard: Volkswagen dumps thousands of cars in desert after emissions scandal

The German auto maker has been storing hundreds of thousands of vehicles around the U.S. for months.

"These vehicles are being stored on an interim basis and routinely maintained in a manner to ensure their long-term operability and quality, so that they may be returned to commerce or exported once USA regulators approve appropriate emissions modifications", she said.

Skoda - a part of the Volkswagen Group has announced a similar buyback offer valid on cars purchased between April 1 2018 and the end of June 2018 and will cover bans introduced within 4 years from the date of purchase.

The court fling said that to the end of December, VW had reacquired 335,000 diesel vehicles, resold 13,000 and destroyed about 28,000 vehicles.

According to the VW spokeswoman these vehicles aren't being stored here permanently and it is only a temporary arrangement.

VW has agreed to spend more than $25 billion in the United States for claims from owners, environmental regulators, states and dealers and offered to buy back about 500,000 polluting US vehicles.

VW confirmed that the buy-back guarantee in Germany would run alongside its just-extended Diesel Environmental Incentive - a scrappage scheme similar to the one in place in the United Kingdom offering discounts to customers who trade-in really old cars.

Through mid-February VW has issued 437,273 letters offering almost $8 billion in compensation and buybacks.

Volkswagen may have abandoned its "Clean Diesel" mantra after the Dieselgate scandal revealed they'd been busy scamming emission tests around the world.

Thomas Zahn, head of sales and marketing Germany of the Volkswagen brand says, "With the Germany Guarantee and the diesel environmental incentive, we are offering our customers security when they choose a diesel and are on their side as a strong partner".

Owing to the ban, the demand for diesel vehicles has reduced dramatically.

The scandal has so far cost the company €20.5billion.

The newest diesels must meet pollution standards during regular driving conditions as well as on test stands.

Volkswagen still faces an array of legal challenges in Germany and worldwide relating to the scandal.