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Twitter urges users to change passwords after storage bug

05 May 2018
Twitter urges users to change passwords after storage bug

Social media giant Twitter is recommending its over 330 million users change their passwords.

The analyst thought it unlikely people would abandon Twitter simply for being asked to change passwords.

The chief technology officer of the company, Parag Agarwal, said in a blog post that a bug has been found out recently which had stored passwords in an internal log.

The bug was fixed and the internal investigation showed that there was no indication of any breach or of misuse by anyone. This is a precautionary request in light of a recent bug discovered by the company which exposed all passwords internally.

The company also said it is "very sorry this happened" and promised it is "committed to earning. trust every day".

The corporate additionally suggests extensively advisable safety suggestions, like turning on two-factor authentication, selecting distinctive passwords for each service, and utilizing a password supervisor app to retailer all of them. Twitter claims once they discovered the "error", they removed all passwords and are "implementing plans to prevent this bug from happening again". That wouldn't have made a change in the Twitter case, but not all online service makes use of hashing, and some that do still depend on older, easier-to-decode versions. As a security measure, Twitter is notifying both mobile and desktop users to change their passwords. Notification has been sent by Twitter to its users asking them to modify their passwords, right away.

Twitter stated it has since mounted the problem.

Simply put, instead of jumbling up your password's characters or encrypting them, this particular log was available to view in plain text.

Use difficult and hard-to-guess passwords.

Twitter Support team has shared the information by making a tweet regarding the issue.

Twitter shares ebbed about a percent to $30.36 in after-market trades that followed word of the password mishap. " You can see the embedded tweet from here".