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Michael Cohen's Lawyers Expected To Stop Representing Him In FBI Probe

14 June 2018
Michael Cohen's Lawyers Expected To Stop Representing Him In FBI Probe

Cohen's current legal team is expected to stay with him for the rest of the week as they struggle to complete a laborious review of a trove of documents and data files seized from him by authorities two months ago.

According to the Journal, Cohen is looking for a federal criminal lawyer in NY, preferably one with close connections to the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office.

Todd Harrison and Stephen Ryan of McDermott, Will & Emery LLP attorneys represented Cohen until now. Plus, a certain leader of the free world known as President Donald J. Trump is reportedly pretty anxious that if he says anything about this, Cohen will tell all, whatever that is.

Unconfirmed reports also said that Cohen is likely to become a witness for the prosecution in a case against President Donald Trump.

Without legal representation, it is likely that Mr. Cohen will cooperate with federal prosecutors in NY, a source told ABC News.

Sources told ABC News that Cohen could "cooperate with federal investigators" as his attorneys jump ship and said the decision to cooperate "is believed to be imminent".

Instead, the judge appointed former federal judge Barbara Jones as a "special master" who could examine the materials to resolve any disputes over attorney client privilege.

The criminal probe into Cohen's business dealings stems in part from a referral by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating whether Trump's 2016 campaign colluded with Russian Federation to influence the US presidential election. Phone messages left for Ryan were not immediately returned. While the Journal's sources report that Cohen has not decided whether to cooperate, ABC reports that he will.

"If anyone can blow up Trump, it's him", an unnamed White House official told Vanity Fair. The New York Times said an issue with payment of legal bills prompted the change.