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Georgia governor race 2018: Stacey Abrams vs. Brian Kemp

05 November 2018
Georgia governor race 2018: Stacey Abrams vs. Brian Kemp

Abrams is locked in a tight race with Republican Brian Kemp as she tries to become the nation's first black female governor.

She is in a neck-and-neck battle with Secretary of State Brian Kemp in a race in which early voting has been marred by allegations of voter suppression that primarily affects blacks.

Abrams is trying to become the first black female governor in US history.

On Thursday, Winfrey called Abrams a "changemaker" who represented the values of all Georgians. Abrams wrote on Twitter, "BIG NEWS: @Oprah is on #TeamAbrams-and she's coming to Georgia on Thursday, 11/1, to help us Get Out The Vote!"

This is the first time Winfrey has campaigned in-person with a political candidate since appearing with then-candidate Barack Obama in 2008.

Last week Will Ferrell and his wife Viveca Paulin-Ferrell were in Georgia spreading the word for the Abrams campaign. Though ticket reservations weren't scheduled to close until Wednesday evening at 5 p.m., both events have already reached capacity as of this writing.

Trump is due in the state on Sunday for a rally supporting Republican candidates including Kemp.

Oprah Winfrey is the latest to add her name to a celebrity lineup supporting Abrams for the governorship. Kemp is leading Abrams among likely voters 46 percent to 45 percent, in the poll. Republicans across the country have pushed policies that have made it more hard to vote in several states in the U.S. The policies have included closing polling places, disenfranchising ex-felons and blocking voter registration. Many have pointed out the conflict of interest of Kemp presiding over the state's election laws as he runs for Governor.

Visits from Trump and Pence - and the location of those events - illustrate that strategy. National Democrats are trying to sway these voters as Republicans consolidate their base around white voters, voters over 60, men, and voters without a college degree.