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National & World News, Stephen Hawking's wheelchair sells for $393,000 at auction

11 November 2018
National & World News, Stephen Hawking's wheelchair sells for $393,000 at auction

A range of personal belongings of British physicist, Stephen Hawking, including his famous motorised red leather wheel chair and a copy of his dissertation thesis have been sold for $1 million in an auction. It had been expected to fetch 10,000 pounds to 15,000 pounds.

The money from the wheelchair will benefit two charities "The Stephen Hawking Foundation" which he founded in 2015 and The Motor Neurone Disease Association.

The copy, one of only five originals of the thesis entitled "Properties of expanding universes", smashed pre-sale expectations four times over to sell for £584,750 at the Christie s sale, which ended on Thursday.

Hawking lived most of his life with motor neurone disease, before dying at the age of 76 in March.

One of the theoretical physicist's wheelchairs was sold at auction smashing its estimate. Mentioned a wheelchair was used by Hawking since the late 1980s-early 1990-ies.

During the auction was able to implement a single instance of the thesis that the scientist has created fifty-three years ago.

Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time, 1988, first American edition, which was signed with a thumbprint. His various medals and awards raised a total of £296,750 or about $390,000.

"The results of this remarkable sale, with more than 400 registered bidders from 30 different countries, demonstrate the enormous admiration and affection with which Stephen Hawking was viewed around the world", according to a statement from Thomas Venning, head of books and manuscripts for Christie's, and James Hyslop, head of science and natural history.

Image: This Simpsons script - an episode that featured Professor Hawking - sold for £6,250. "A small plastic model of his yellow Simpsons incarnation had pride of place in his house".

The physicist's daughter, Lucy, said Christie's had been helping the family & "manage our beloved father's unique and precious collection of personal and professional belongings".